Israel - Dov Chernichovsky

April 15, 2019

This research analyzes the Israeli Food Basket and identifies its household-budget implications. Researchers found that on average a nutritious food basket costs NIS 844 (or 216 US dollars) per adult, and a mean monthly cost per child of NIS 737 (in 2015 prices). These costs make the ideal healthy food basket unattainable for nearly half the population. The bottom two quartiles spend on average less than half per adults and children.

  • Country: Israel
  • Publication Year: 2019
  • Type of Media: Scientific Report

Healthcare in Israel: An Overview

This article summarizes two key interrelated threats to the still relatively high performing Israeli health care system: (a) the comparative shortage of state funding, especially in view of fast aging population and technological change, and (b) the awkward regulation of Supplemental Insurance. The latter leads to escalating private expenditure on health care and MDs’ incomes, with growing disparities in access to care and inefficiencies.

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December 23, 2018

The report disentangles Israel’s fascinating fertility patterns across ethnic-religious groups. Israel’s high fertility (TFR of 3.1 in 2015) is driven by rising fertility amongst the majority secular women population.

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April 16, 2019

This article discusses the signs today that the relative health status of Israel’s population may deteriorate in the future, as a result of rising tension between medical needs and resources that stems from state policy of reducing its share of finance in the system .

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Israel’s population is aging quickly; the share of seniors in the population, especially those aged 70 and over, is projected to double by 2035. Due to this, functional impairment — which is naturally higher among the elderly — is expected to rise 16 percent faster than growth in Israel’s population. This will increase the need for in-home as well as institutional long-term care. The changing ratio between age-groups — more people aged 70 and over, in relation to those aged 15-69 — is expected to increase the long-term care challenge as well as the burden on households and on the economy as a whole.

This paper discusses the main challenges currently facing long-term care in Israel: (A) the lack of universal coverage; (B) the multiplicity of authorities charged with overseeing and managing the sector; and (C) the lack of preparation for the changing demographics of the future. This paper also looks at current Israeli government proposals for regulating the field, and points out the inconsistencies and weaknesses in those proposals.

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